dailyotter:

Otter Drops in for Dinner
Thanks, teakura!
[Zoorasia/Yokohama Zoological Gardens, Japan]

dailyotter:

Otter Drops in for Dinner

Thanks, teakura!

[Zoorasia/Yokohama Zoological Gardens, Japan]

ancientart:

Dogs represented in ancient Mexican art at the LACMA (Part 2)

The first dog is shown to be on a wheeled platform. This artefact is from Veracruz and dates to AD 450-650. The rest of the shown artefacts are from Colima and date to 200 BC- AD 500. The 2nd dog has a turtle shell on its back, and the final artwork shows dogs playing.

Courtesy of & currently located at the LACMA, California, USA, via their online collections (AC1996.146.40M.86.296.157, M.83.217.26, M.86.296.207). As you may have already noted, the LACMA houses a lot of really interesting art from ancient Mexico. Here is Part 1 of the dog representations. 

alwaysalwaysalwaysthesea:

Moderne Wanddekoration Mit Kunstverglasungen / Art Nouveau Contemporary wall decoration with stained glass, by Richard Kühnel, ca. 1889-1928.

This is how buggy we are.

alwaysalwaysalwaysthesea:

Moderne Wanddekoration Mit Kunstverglasungen / Art Nouveau Contemporary wall decoration with stained glass, by Richard Kühnel, ca. 1889-1928.

This is how buggy we are.

maptitude1:

This map shows the religious divides of Iraq

maptitude1:

This map shows the religious divides of Iraq

it-grrl:


Dear Baba Yaga,I am afraid that I cannot distinguish what satisfies me because it is prestigious and challenging from what truly makes me happy. I haven’t yet found a balance, so the former wins out every time and I am afraid of wasting my youth on my career. The other day I found my first gray hair.
BABA YAGA:You cannot tell the difference because, in part, they are the same thing, & because you do not yet know all the other things that make you happy. ; You must find & name yr hungriest wolves & then feed them accordingly. If yr work wolf howls louder than the others, throw him some good scraps to shut him up, then feed the second hungriest, & so on. —You . are a smart girl. Now do what you can to know yr wolves & keep them all strong, not starving.

So The Hairpin does this advice series called Ask Baba Yaga and obviously it is the greatest.

it-grrl:

Dear Baba Yaga,
I am afraid that I cannot distinguish what satisfies me because it is prestigious and challenging from what truly makes me happy. I haven’t yet found a balance, so the former wins out every time and I am afraid of wasting my youth on my career. The other day I found my first gray hair.

BABA YAGA:
You cannot tell the difference because, in part, they are the same thing, & because you do not yet know all the other things that make you happy. ; You must find & name yr hungriest wolves & then feed them accordingly. If yr work wolf howls louder than the others, throw him some good scraps to shut him up, then feed the second hungriest, & so on. —You . are a smart girl. Now do what you can to know yr wolves & keep them all strong, not starving.

So The Hairpin does this advice series called Ask Baba Yaga and obviously it is the greatest.

amidskycayla:

I’m begging you please share this! My cousin is 15 and has been missing for almost 2 weeks.

amidskycayla:

I’m begging you please share this! My cousin is 15 and has been missing for almost 2 weeks.

bryankonietzko:

michaeldantedimartino:

The official, 100% real Korra Book 3 trailer is here! New Book 3 music by Jeremy Zuckerman. Edited by Jeff Adams. Motion graphics by Matt Gadbois. Enjoy!

Thanks to the shenanigans of Leaky McLeakerpants, we have released the *OFFICIAL* Book 3 trailer early. Hope you enjoy! Also here on Nick.com.

bryankonietzko:

faitherinhicks:

every. damn. day.

Ha ha! Brilliant, Faith. Tumblr brings me this pain daily too. When I grow up I hope to draw and paint as well as some of the 16-year-olds I see on here. I’ll only be three or four times older than they were by that point.

bryankonietzko:

faitherinhicks:

every. damn. day.

Ha ha! Brilliant, Faith. Tumblr brings me this pain daily too. When I grow up I hope to draw and paint as well as some of the 16-year-olds I see on here. I’ll only be three or four times older than they were by that point.

corporisfabrica:

Retinæ as seen through fluorescein angiogram.

The innermost wall of the interior of the eye is lined with the photosensitive cells of the retina.  These images visualize the blood vessels which supply these cells and make vision possible. Originating from the blind spot around the optic disc, these vessels seem to converge upon the dark region at the center. This is the macula lutea, which contains the densely-packed cells responsible for the human eye’s greatest visual potential and your sharpest vision.

If you attempt to read this post at the corner of your eye, you will find it entirely impossible; the parts of the retina responsible for peripheral vision simply lack the resolution for such tasks. 

dduane:

(The Mystery of Go, the Ancient Game That Computers Still Can’t Win )
"Invented over 2500 years ago in China, Go is a pastime beloved by emperors and generals, intellectuals and child prodigies. Like chess, it’s a deterministic perfect information game — a game where no information is hidden from either player, and there are no built-in elements of chance, such as dice. And like chess, it’s a two-person war game. Play begins with an empty board, where players alternate the placement of black and white stones, attempting to surround territory while avoiding capture by the enemy. That may seem simpler than chess, but it’s not. When Deep Blue was busy beating Kasparov, the best Go programs couldn’t even challenge a decent amateur. And despite huge computing advances in the years since — Kasparov would probably lose to your home computer — the automation of expert-level Go remains one of AI’s greatest unsolved riddles."

dduane:

(The Mystery of Go, the Ancient Game That Computers Still Can’t Win )

"Invented over 2500 years ago in China, Go is a pastime beloved by emperors and generals, intellectuals and child prodigies. Like chess, it’s a deterministic perfect information game — a game where no information is hidden from either player, and there are no built-in elements of chance, such as dice. And like chess, it’s a two-person war game. Play begins with an empty board, where players alternate the placement of black and white stones, attempting to surround territory while avoiding capture by the enemy. That may seem simpler than chess, but it’s not. When Deep Blue was busy beating Kasparov, the best Go programs couldn’t even challenge a decent amateur. And despite huge computing advances in the years since — Kasparov would probably lose to your home computer — the automation of expert-level Go remains one of AI’s greatest unsolved riddles."

In interviews, Dr. Angelou used the term “prostitute” to refer to her previous employment without rancor or shame. She spoke candidly to her family about it. She told her mother, brother, and son she would redact the information from the book, but only if they were uncomfortable with it. She had no issue whatsoever with speaking her truth. So why do we not know about it, save for hushed whispers and the occasional salacious reference in reports about and interviews of her? What’s so wrong with our beloved and lovely Maya Angelou having been a sex worker and brothel manager?

Respectability politics no doubt play a role in the erasure of her history as a sex worker. With a wide brush, details on it have been painted over by those who won’t acknowledge such a thing, brushing past it to talk about her awards and accolades. But she had no problem stating plainly: “There are many ways to prostitute one’s self.”

It comes to this: there is no way, in the minds of most people, to have worked as a prostitute and not be ashamed of it. Most people believe there is no way to have held this job (and it is a job), move onto other things, and not consider it a “seamy life” or “shameful secret.” To most people, there is no way a woman of Maya Angelou’s caliber could ever have performed as a sex worker. The idea just won’t gel for them, but that doesn’t mean it’s not the truth. Maya Angelou: Poet Laureate, Pulitzer nominee, Tony Award winner, best selling author, poetess, winner of more than 50 honorary degrees, mother, sister, daughter, wife, National Medal of Arts winner, Presidential Medal of Freedom winner, consummate and powerful woman, artist, and former sex worker. Yes, the woman you love, the woman we all love, the incomparable Dr. Maya Angelou was a sex worker and she proved, in her life and her stories, that there’s nothing wrong with it.
peechingtonmariejust in her excellent Tits and Sass post today, “The Erasure of Maya Angelou’s Sex Work History” (via laughingacademy)
cleolinda:

zerosociety:

heavymetalhippy:

hungrylikethewolfie:

greencarnations:

dannyrandy:

"twisting classical characters like dorian gray into a homosexual"
i’m fucking crying

TWISTING CLASSICAL CHARACTERS LIKE DORIAN GRAY INTO A HOMOSEXUAL



What show is the idiot talking about?

Penny Dreadful.

lawl son

cleolinda:

zerosociety:

heavymetalhippy:

hungrylikethewolfie:

greencarnations:

dannyrandy:

"twisting classical characters like dorian gray into a homosexual"

i’m fucking crying

TWISTING CLASSICAL CHARACTERS LIKE DORIAN GRAY INTO A HOMOSEXUAL

image

What show is the idiot talking about?

Penny Dreadful.

lawl son

sciencesoup:


Prokaryotes vs Eukaryotes
We know how to tell if something is alive or not, but if a bacterium and a dog are both living organisms, then what differentiates them? There are actually two distinct types of living beings, prokaryotes and eukaryotes, each made up of specialised prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In the three phylums of life—bacteria, archaea, and eukarya—prokaryotes cover the first two, and eukaryotes cover eukarya. You can probably already guess which groups a bacterium and a dog belong to, but let’s find out why.
All cells (i.e., both prokaryotes and eukaryotes) contain four common structures:
A plasma membrane, which is a “barrier” that separates the cell from the outside world, like how your skin prevents your organs from falling out.
The cytoplasm, which is the jelly-like substance that takes up the spaces inside the cell that aren’t already occupied by organelles.
Nucleic acids, the genetic material, which tell the cell how to operate and reproduce.
Ribosomes, where protein synthesis takes place according to the information contained in the genetic material. Proteins are organic compounds essential to living organisms, and they’ll be explored in more detail in a later article.
But there are also fundamental differences between living cells. Prokaryotic organisms as a whole are much smaller than eukaryotes, because they’re just made up of single cells, while eukaryotic organisms are made up of many specialised cells. The size of individual cells is different, too: prokaryotes are about 1-10 µm (micrometres) in diameter, while eukaryotes are 10-100 µm. If you want to get your head around the scale of things, go nuts with this interactive page.
Prokaryotes also lack a nuclear compartment and other membrane-bound organelles (which are like little organs within cells, each performing specific functions), so their genetic material and basic functioning processes happen out in the open, in the cytoplasm. This allows for less specialisation, so prokaryotes turn out to be pretty simple cells.

(Image source)
They reproduce asexually by binary fission, meaning that each cell splits in two to create a copy of itself. This gives rise to less diversity, but there is some scope for something called “horizontal gene exchange”: directly exchanging genetic information between the same generation, as opposed to passing genetic information onto the next generation. See illicit bacterial sex tape here.
Eukaryotes, on the other hand, have a range of organelles designed to perform specialised functions, such as the mitochondria, which creates the cell’s energy, the chloroplast, which converts light energy to chemical energy in plants, and the Golgi body, which modifies and processes proteins. This “compartmentalisation” allows for greater complexity—different compartments can have different functions even if they conflict, because they’re sealed off from each other.
Eukaryotes divide and reproduce by mitosis (the division of cells for tissue growth) and meiosis (the division of sex cells), and what results is two parents passing their genetic information onto the next generation. This creates the opportunity for more diversity, though it’s a longer process—some prokaryotes can divide and create a new organism in 20 minutes flat, while in humans it’s just a tad longer than that.
So what’s the difference between a bacterium and a dog? You can probably answer that yourself: bacteria are prokaryotic organisms and dogs are eukaryotic.
Further resources: Comparison table and Khan Academy video

sciencesoup:

Prokaryotes vs Eukaryotes

We know how to tell if something is alive or not, but if a bacterium and a dog are both living organisms, then what differentiates them? There are actually two distinct types of living beings, prokaryotes and eukaryotes, each made up of specialised prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In the three phylums of life—bacteria, archaea, and eukarya—prokaryotes cover the first two, and eukaryotes cover eukarya. You can probably already guess which groups a bacterium and a dog belong to, but let’s find out why.

All cells (i.e., both prokaryotes and eukaryotes) contain four common structures:

  1. A plasma membrane, which is a “barrier” that separates the cell from the outside world, like how your skin prevents your organs from falling out.
  2. The cytoplasm, which is the jelly-like substance that takes up the spaces inside the cell that aren’t already occupied by organelles.
  3. Nucleic acids, the genetic material, which tell the cell how to operate and reproduce.
  4. Ribosomes, where protein synthesis takes place according to the information contained in the genetic material. Proteins are organic compounds essential to living organisms, and they’ll be explored in more detail in a later article.

But there are also fundamental differences between living cells. Prokaryotic organisms as a whole are much smaller than eukaryotes, because they’re just made up of single cells, while eukaryotic organisms are made up of many specialised cells. The size of individual cells is different, too: prokaryotes are about 1-10 µm (micrometres) in diameter, while eukaryotes are 10-100 µm. If you want to get your head around the scale of things, go nuts with this interactive page.

Prokaryotes also lack a nuclear compartment and other membrane-bound organelles (which are like little organs within cells, each performing specific functions), so their genetic material and basic functioning processes happen out in the open, in the cytoplasm. This allows for less specialisation, so prokaryotes turn out to be pretty simple cells.

(Image source)

They reproduce asexually by binary fission, meaning that each cell splits in two to create a copy of itself. This gives rise to less diversity, but there is some scope for something called “horizontal gene exchange”: directly exchanging genetic information between the same generation, as opposed to passing genetic information onto the next generation. See illicit bacterial sex tape here.

Eukaryotes, on the other hand, have a range of organelles designed to perform specialised functions, such as the mitochondria, which creates the cell’s energy, the chloroplast, which converts light energy to chemical energy in plants, and the Golgi body, which modifies and processes proteins. This “compartmentalisation” allows for greater complexity—different compartments can have different functions even if they conflict, because they’re sealed off from each other.

Eukaryotes divide and reproduce by mitosis (the division of cells for tissue growth) and meiosis (the division of sex cells), and what results is two parents passing their genetic information onto the next generation. This creates the opportunity for more diversity, though it’s a longer process—some prokaryotes can divide and create a new organism in 20 minutes flat, while in humans it’s just a tad longer than that.

So what’s the difference between a bacterium and a dog? You can probably answer that yourself: bacteria are prokaryotic organisms and dogs are eukaryotic.

Further resources: Comparison table and Khan Academy video