allthingseurope:

Hagia Sophia, Istanbul (by David Hurley)

Being under that dome is like being pulled up to heaven.

allthingseurope:

Hagia Sophia, Istanbul (by David Hurley)

Being under that dome is like being pulled up to heaven.

photojojo:

It’s difficult to imagine a world without smartphones, social media, and technology in general. But even with all of this tech, remnants of an older world are all around us, a phenomenon that’s particularly felt in Tokyo.

Photographer Matthew Pillsbury traveled to the capital of Japan to capture this fascinating arrangement, where ancient temples sit side-by-side with tech superstores and restaurants staffed by robots.

The Old World Meets Technology in Long Exposure Photos of Tokyo

via Slate

lettersfromtitan:

migghosty:

anightvaleintern:

wetmattos:

eshusplayground:

opalborn:

intrepidcrow:

queerlittlemermaid:

carpeumbra:

klay-ra:

I’m just gonna start preaching this shit.

By John Gever, Senior Editor, MedPage Today

Published: April 30, 2012
Reviewed by Zalman S. Agus, MD; Emeritus Professor, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A mysterious and troubling phenomenon called “visual snow” is a distinct syndrome that does not appear to stem from illicit drug use, a researcher said here. People with visual snow report seeing a mix of swimming dots, flying objects, and trailing shadow images that fill the visual field all the time.

"…It is probably nothing more than an exaggerated type of normal visual function."

Those with the disturbance “tend to be people who are very observant … people who are really hyperobservant of their world. There’s a real controversy as to how much of this is a heightened awareness of normal phenomena,” Friedman said.

He said the visual-snow phenomenon centers on a disturbance described as similar to watching a grainy TV picture. Patients can still see real objects but with tiny black and white dots throughout the visual field.

Another common aspect of the syndrome is that, when patients look at a clear blue sky, they see small white objects zooming around randomly.

A third feature is that moving objects appear to leave trails behind them.

Most but not all respondents saw the zooming white objects in the sky and the trails behind moving objects. More than half, but not necessarily the same half, reported a variety of other effects. These included halos and starbursts surrounding objects, floaters, poor night vision, photosensitivity, and colored swirls and waves when their eyes were closed.

Those with the disturbance “tend to be people who are very observant … people who are really hyperobservant of their world. There’s a real controversy as to how much of this is a heightened awareness of normal phenomena,” Friedman said.

She noted the prevalence of so-called entopic phenomena in Schankin’s sample — the floaters, zooming white objects, and images seen even with closed eyes. Such perceptions usually stem from retinal activation.

"When we have entopic firing from our retina … if you look at the white wall and really focus on it with the right lighting, you can see it," she said. "It’s the same thing with afterimages. It’s normal to see afterimages."

"Most of us pay no attention to it," Friedman continued. "But if you’re a really observant person, you start noticing it, and then you notice it all the time.”

Schankin said that many of the patients were indeed “extremely high functioning.”

I’m so glad this was finally validated.

The doctors said visual snow was only when you saw snow/dots falling. That isn’t what I see. I have this. My weird-eye thing has a name now. I have no words.

Oh. I totally thought this was just a normal eye thing. Apparently I have visual snow.

I’ve spent a significant portion of my life trying to explain this phenomenon to my optometrists in an attempt to get rid of it.

This is something I’ve had my whole life. Just a few days ago, it was sunny outside, and I kept seeing patterns like a flock of birds in flight.

Oh, look, me

I have this but like on and off?

I have these symptoms, but they’re a part of my acephalgic migraines. So, y’know, for those who don’t know what they have, only that they have these issues? Could be that.

Wait this isn’t everyone?

laughterkey:

land-of-propaganda:

3 years in Rikers Island, 2 in solitary confinement, this high school student, NEVER CHARGED, gets released

16-year-old high school sophomore Kalief Browder, of the Bronx, spent nearly three years locked up at the Rikers Jail after he says he was falsely accused of stealing a backpack.  Amazingly, Browder never pleaded guilty, actually refused to plead guilty and requested a trial, even when pressured, but was never convicted and was only offered plea deals while the trial was repeatedly delayed.

Near the end of his time in jail, the judge “offered” to sentence him to time served if a guilty plea was entered, and warned him he could face 15 years in prison if convicted, but Browder still refused to accept the deal.  The only reason Browder was finally released was because his case was dismissed, but the damage had been done.

Browder, a high school student, spent an unbelievable 800 days, or over 2 years, in solitary confinement, which is a common juvenile imprisonment practice that the New York Department of Corrections has now banned after several investigations.

How does a teen end up in jail for 3 years, of which 2 years was spent in solitary confinement, and never be charged with a crime?

Browder’s case highlights several broken mechanisms in the New York legal system that feeds itself to civil liberty abuses on our youth.

  1. The 6th amendment gives us a right to a speedy trial, but in New York they have a “Ready Rule”.  The “Ready Rule” allows the courts to postpone trial dates by offering continuances. The system may give a continuance for 1 week, but logistically it may be 1 month before the trial actually comes to fruition and the still not convicted civilian only gets “credit” for the 1 week, not the actual time they have served.  In Browder’s case, he was given an absolutely ridiculous number of continuances initiated by the prosecution which left him locked up because he could not afford the $3000 bail.
  2. Browder was a high school student and juveniles are supposed to continue their education while behind bars .. except for juveniles that are in solitary confinement.  Guards would place juveniles in solitary and the schooling would stop relinquishing any educational support.
  3. While in solitary, Browder says that guards would routinely refuse to give him his meals.  Hunger is a common complaint by teens that are locked up because of the 12-hour stretch between dinner and breakfast.  Guards would use starve tactics at their discretion for punishment or their own personal enjoyment.  Browder says the worst of his starvations lasted for 4 meals in a row, meaning he was denied breakfast, lunch, dinner and another breakfast.
  4. As it stands, the courts place people in these situations and it is human nature for some to strike a plea deal just to get out of jail.  But Browder did not play into their game and take a plea deal, but maintained his innocence and requested a trial which came at a snail’s pace. This leads one to believe that the courts use this a planned tactic or procedure to play on human nature all in the name of getting convictions.
  5. The issues of using a Public Defender have long been recorded across the country.  In New York, court appointed lawyers make $75 a case.  In order to make money, that PD has to take on huge caseloads which leads to other problems.  Browder, although locked up for nearly three years in Rikers, where his PD was located everyday, never once was visited by his PD or had anyone to advocate his case for him.  This shows a reckless disregard which leads to a vicious cycle of apathy that often leads innocent people to copping pleas or getting longer sentences.

Read more here

He was charged, but never convicted. Per the newyorker:

The next day, he was led into a courtroom, where he learned that he had been charged with robbery, grand larceny, and assault. 

Not trying to imply that in any way makes this better. It’s horrifying from top to bottom.

lohrien:

Illustrations by Seth Fitts dA l tumblr

bobbycaputo:

Finland at Night by Mikko Lagersted

fygr:

Rindge, Kalmbach, Logie & Co. Shoe Factory (by PPWIII)

fygr:

Rindge, Kalmbach, Logie & Co. Shoe Factory (by PPWIII)

hchamp:

12 month solargraph, winter solstice to winter solstice.

hchamp:

12 month solargraph, winter solstice to winter solstice.

mymodernmet:

Louisiana-based photographer Frank Relle captures the nighttime magic of New Orleans in his ongoing series New Orleans Nightscapes. He uses long exposures to capture the feeling of the powerful, haunting beauty throughout his hometown.

imaginarycircus:

subterraneanscum:

the cat makes this pic

imaginarycircus:

subterraneanscum:

the cat makes this pic

blogearthbound:

erikkwakkel:

Hidden Book
This unusual shot I took some time ago when I visited the Abbey of Rolduc, in the south of the Netherlands. While my finger carefully lifts the loose cover of a sixteenth-century printed book, you are shown the inside of the binding, where the backs of the quires are held together by a horizontal strip of parchment. What’s so special about this scene is the fact that this strip was cut from a handwritten medieval manuscript - old-fashioned and therefore ideal for cutting up and recycling, binders thought. And so this early-fifteenth-century handwritten Dutch Bible found itself being sliced and diced. “I loved once,” the exposed text reads with a flair of irony and tragedy (Ic hebbe gheminnet). My finger allowed the strip to peek at the world again for the first time in centuries: that thought alone makes research of these fragments a thrilling activity.
Pic (my own): Rolduc Abbey, printed book in the attic library. More on fragments in this blog post.

cool! see this a lot- recycled parchment scraps used as lining materials

blogearthbound:

erikkwakkel:

Hidden Book

This unusual shot I took some time ago when I visited the Abbey of Rolduc, in the south of the Netherlands. While my finger carefully lifts the loose cover of a sixteenth-century printed book, you are shown the inside of the binding, where the backs of the quires are held together by a horizontal strip of parchment. What’s so special about this scene is the fact that this strip was cut from a handwritten medieval manuscript - old-fashioned and therefore ideal for cutting up and recycling, binders thought. And so this early-fifteenth-century handwritten Dutch Bible found itself being sliced and diced. “I loved once,” the exposed text reads with a flair of irony and tragedy (Ic hebbe gheminnet). My finger allowed the strip to peek at the world again for the first time in centuries: that thought alone makes research of these fragments a thrilling activity.

Pic (my own): Rolduc Abbey, printed book in the attic library. More on fragments in this blog post.

cool! see this a lot- recycled parchment scraps used as lining materials

Hollywood, CA in the 1960s [x]

mapletheleonberger:

…what have I done?